Top 50 Quotes You Need for Your Essay from Pride and Prejudice

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Writing an essay on Pride and Prejudice, but not sure which quotes are important? 

Look no further! We’ve got 50 quotes and 5 themes that will help you spark some great ideas when writing about Pride and Prejudice. 

To discover the top quotes you’ll want to remember, just scroll down! 

The Fluidity and Rigidity of the Regency Social Hierarchy
The Disparity between Female and Male Power
The Economic Institution of Marriage
Social Norms and the Shaping of Prejudice
The Tenacity of Family Relationships

The Fluidity and Rigidity of the Regency Social Hierarchy

Pride and Prejudice Quotes - Hierarchy

#1: She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me.

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Insulting tone, juxtaposition, archetype of the snobbish aristocrat
  • Chapter 3  

#2: The hall, the dining-room, and all its furniture, were examined and praised; and his commendation of everything would have touched Mrs. Bennet’s heart, but for the mortifying supposition of his viewing it all as his own future property. 

  • Characters: Mr. Collins
  • Techniques: Listing, foreshadowing, figurative language
  • Chapter 13

#3: My situation in life, my connections with the family of de Bourgh, and my relationship to your own, are circumstances highly in my favour.

  • Characters: Mr Collins (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Anaphora, repetition, first-person possessive 
  • Chapter 19

#4: “I am astonished,” said Miss Bingley, “that my father should have left so small a collection of books.—What a delightful library you have at Pemberley, Mr. Darcy!”

  • Characters: Miss Bingley (speaker), Mr. Darcy
  • Techniques: Hyperbole, flattering tone, archetype of the nouveau riche 
  • Chapter 7

#5: He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman’s daughter. So far we are equal.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennett (speaker), Catherine de Bourgh
  • Techniques: Repetition, high modality 
  • Chapter 56

#6: Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your connections?—to congratulate myself on the hope of relations, whose condition in life is so decidedly beneath my own?

  • Characters: Mr Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Rhetorical question, contrast, juxtaposition 
  • Chapter 34

#7: Mr. Wickham’s chief object was unquestionably my sister’s fortune, which is thirty thousand pounds.

  • Characters: Mr Wickham
  • Techniques: Synecdoche, objectification   
  • Chapter 35

#8: The Bennets were speedily pronounced to be the luckiest family in the world, though only a few weeks before, when Lydia had first run away, they had been generally proved to be marked out for misfortune.

  • Characters: Lydia Bennet, the Bennet Family
  • Techniques: Contrast, superlative, hyperbole
  • Chapter 55

#9: “You have a very small park here,” returned Lady Catherine after a short silence… “This must be a most inconvenient sitting room for the evening…”

  • Characters: Catherine de Bourgh (speaker), the Bennet family
  • Techniques: Rude plain tone, metaphor, symbolism
  • Chapter 56

#10: “They are descended, on the maternal side, from the same noble line; and, on the father’s, from respectable, honourable, and ancient—though untitled—families. Their fortune on both sides is splendid.”

  • Characters: Catherine de Bourgh (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet, Mr. Darcy, Anne de Bourgh
  • Techniques: Asyndeton, short truncated sentence
  • Chapter 56

#11: “Heaven and earth!—of what are you thinking? Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?”

  • Characters: Catherine de Bourgh (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Metaphor, symbolism, biblical allusion, exclamatory language
  • Chapter 56

The Disparity between Female and Male Power

Pride and Prejudice Quotes - Male VS Female Power

#12: “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

  • Characters: Narrator 
  • Techniques: Aphorism, hyperbole
  • Chapter 1

#13: “I hope you saw her petticoat, six inches deep in mud, I am absolutely certain.”

  • Characters: Caroline Bingley (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Symbolism, declarative sentences, visual imagery 
  • Chapter 8

#14: Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her. He really believed, that were it not for the inferiority of her connections, he should be in some danger.

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy, Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Metaphor, connotations/allusions to witchery 
  • Chapter 10 

#15: As I must therefore conclude that you are not serious in your rejection of me, I shall choose to attribute it to your wish of increasing my love by suspense, according to the usual practice of elegant females.

  • Characters: Mr. Collins (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Asyndeton, unnecessary verbose language, comical mood
  • Chapter 19

#16: Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to plague you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker), Mr. Collins
  • Techniques: Contrast, declarative language
  • Chapter 19 

#17: marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.

  • Characters: Charlotte Lucas
  • Techniques: Alliteration, foreshadowing 
  • Chapter 22

#18: In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

  • Characters: Mr Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Animated tone, truncated sentence length, assonance, juxtaposition, paradox 
  • Chapter 34

#19: They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet, Mr. Gardiner, Mrs. Gardiner
  • Techniques: Metonym
  • Chapter 43

#20: Her astonishment however was extreme, and continually was she repeating, ‘Why is he so altered? From what can it proceed? It cannot be for me, it cannot be for my sake that his manners are thus softened.’

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker), Mr. Darcy
  • Techniques: Rhetorical question, repetition 
  • Chapter 43

#21: “Though I know it must be a scandalous falsehood, though I would not injure him so much as to suppose the truth of it possible, I instantly resolved on setting off for this place, that I might make my sentiments known to you.”

  • Characters: Catherine de Bourgh (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Paradox, satire
  • Chapter 56

#22: “Neither duty, nor honour, nor gratitude,” replied Elizabeth, “have any possible claim on me, in the present instance. No principle of either would be violated by my marriage with Mr. Darcy.”

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker), Catherine de Bourgh
  • Techniques: Consonance, parallel syntax
  • Chapter 56

#23: By you, I was properly humbled. I came to you without a doubt of my reception. You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Repetition, consonance
  • Chapter 58

#24: Such relief, however, as it was in her power to afford, by the practice of what might be called economy in her own private expenses, she frequently sent them.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet, Lydia Bennet
  • Techniques: Euphemism, symbolism 
  • Chapter 61

The Economic Institution of Marriage

Pride and Prejudice Quotes - Marriage

#25: To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.

  • Characters: Mr. Bingley, Jane Bennet
  • Techniques: Aphorism
  • Chapter 3

#26: What are young men to rocks and mountains?

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker)
  • Techniques: Rhetorical question, juxtaposition 
  • Chapter 27

#27: A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker), Miss Bingley 
  • Techniques: Anaphora, metaphor
  • Chapter 6

#28: “All this she must possess,” added Darcy, “and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.”

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet, Miss Bingley
  • Techniques: Declarative language, argument 
  • Chapter 7

#29: Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other, or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least.

  • Characters: Charlotte Lucas (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet 
  • Techniques: Hyperbole, logos, defeated tone
  • Chapter 6

#30: I am not romantic, you know; I never was. I ask only a comfortable home; and considering Mr. Collins’s character, connection, and situation in life, I am convinced that my chance of happiness with him is as fair as most people can boast on entering the marriage state.

  • Characters: Charlotte Lucas (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet 
  • Techniques: Anaphora, alliteration, simile, lexical Chain
  • Chapter 22

#31: With these rooms I might now have been familiarly acquainted! Instead of viewing them as a stranger, I might have rejoiced in them as my own, and welcomed to them as visitors my uncle and aunt.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Exclamatory language
  • Chapter 43

#32: She has no money, no connections, nothing that can tempt him to — she is lost forever.

  • Characters: Lydia Bennet 
  • Techniques: Conduplicatio (repetition), parataxis (short sentence after long sentences)
  • Chapter 46

#33: She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man, who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Epiphany, plain language
  • Chapter 50

#34: You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking, and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker)
  • Techniques: Juxtaposition, polysyndeton
  • Chapter 60

Social Norms and the Shaping of Prejudice 

Pride and Prejudice Quotes - Social Norms

#35: His character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy
  • Techniques: Superlative 
  • Chapter 3 

#36: “I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.”

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker), Charlotte Lucas
  • Techniques: First person possessive, chiasmus
  • Chapter 5 

#37: “My temper would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.” 

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker)
  • Techniques: Repetition, hyperbole
  • Chapter 11

#38: “And your defect is to hate everybody.” “And yours,” he replied with a smile, “is willfully to misunderstand them.”

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Parallel syntax, subversion 
  • Chapter 11

#39: He was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker), Mr. Darcy, Jane Bennet 
  • Techniques: Consonance, repetition 
  • Chapter 33

#40: If you have not been mistaken here, I must have been in error.

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Tautology
  • Chapter 35

#41: If I have wounded your sister’s feelings, it was unknowingly done and though the motives which governed me may to you very naturally appear insufficient, I have not yet learnt to condemn them.

  • Characters: Mr. Darcy (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Pathos, apologetic tone 
  • Chapter 35

#42: She grew absolutely ashamed of herself. Of neither Darcy nor Wickham could she think without feeling she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker)
  • Techniques: Asyndeton, hyperbole
  • Chapter 36

#43: Till this moment I never knew myself. 

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker)
  • Techniques: Epiphany, catharsis 
  • Chapter 36

#44: And yet I meant to be uncommonly clever in taking so decided a dislike to him, without any reason.

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker)
  • Techniques: Contrast, paradox  
  • Chapter 40

#45: She blushed again and again over the perverseness of the meeting. And his behaviour, so strikingly altered—what could it mean? That he should even speak to her was amazing!—but to speak with such civility, to inquire after her family! 

  • Characters: Elizabeth Bennet (speaker), Mr. Darcy
  • Techniques: Rhetorical question, subversion, fragmented language
  • Chapter 43

The Tenacity of Family Relationships

Pride and Prejudice - Family

#46: Her hopes were answered; Jane had not been gone long before it rained hard. Her sisters were uneasy for her, but her mother was delighted.

  • Characters: Mrs. Bennet, Jane Bennet
  • Techniques: juxtaposition, foreshadowing 
  • Chapter 8

#47: Lydia will never be easy until she has exposed herself in some public place or other, and we can never expect her to do it with so little expense or inconvenience to her family as under the present circumstances.

  • Characters: Mr. Bennet (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet 
  • Techniques: Hyperbole, character flaw 
  • Chapter 40

#48: “Oh! Lizzy, why am I thus singled from my family, and blessed above them all! If I could but see you as happy! If there were but such another man for you!”

  • Characters: Jane Bennet (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet
  • Techniques: Exclamation, fragmented language 
  • Chapter 55

#49: I know that you could be neither happy nor respectable, unless you truly esteemed your husband; unless you looked up to him as a superior.

  • Characters: Mr. Bennet (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet 
  • Techniques: Parataxis, consonance 
  • Chapter 59

#50: Happy for all her maternal feelings was the day on which Mrs. Bennet got rid of her two most deserving daughters.

  • Characters: Mrs. Bennet (speaker), Elizabeth Bennet, Jane Bennet
  • Techniques: Satire, juxtaposition
  • Chapter 61

#51 (bonus!): Kitty, to her very material advantage, spent the chief of her time with her two elder sisters. In society so superior to what she had generally known, her improvement was great.

  • Characters: Kitty Bennet, Elizabeth Bennet, Jane Bennet
  • Techniques: Consonance, euphemism, metonymy
  • Chapter 61

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Lynn Chen is a Content Writer at Art of Smart Education and is a Communication student at UTS with a major in Creative Writing. Lynn’s articles have been published in Vertigo, The Comma, and Shut Up and Go. In her spare time, she also writes poetry.



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